American Psycho | Hipster Runoff

American Psycho

Not sure which ‘cover’ of ‘This must be the Place’ is the most authentic.

I started listening 2 a lot of Talking Heads, because I want to get more in touch with the roots of conceptual pop music. Feel like I'll appreciate modern indie music if I travel back in time and listen to 'what was once cool'/'cutting edge'/'progressive.' Seems like things from the past influence things in the present, and the present becomes the past, influencing things in the future.

I recently saw a meme where some bro 'covered' the hit song "This Must Be the Place." I think that he might be 'trying to go viral' by 'ripping off' the American Psycho Club movie.

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Not sure what attracts people to the 'Patrick Bateman' aesthetic. It seems like people just want to 'be rich' and 'kill sluts' or something. He might represent 'perfection', and we all think that 1 day we are going to move 2 NYC and 'be rich.' Not sure what AmPsychy has to do with the song though. Seems like a gimmick meme/something that mainstream film bros did to 'feel creative.'

Might decide to listen 2 more MGMT. If I were a tween indie kid, I would say that this is my fave cover of 'This Must Be the Place.' Saw this video of them when they were just a 'zany college campus band.' Sorta wish they were still 'this organic', instead of some sort of over-marketed, post-OfMontreal bloghouse indie jam band who will 'go hard' on the festival circuit for the next 15 years.

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Kinda weird 2 see altcelebs before they were 'alt famous.' Can't believe these were the bros who wrote the transcendental masterpiece "KIDS." Can't believe they knew about the song 'This Must Be The Place' even though they were so young. Maybe their altParents made them listen 2 it in the car. Sorta wish I lived in the dormitory behind them, so I could say 'the MGMT played at my dorm.'

Think it might be the 'most authentic' to say that u prefer 'the original' version of the song, which is the Talking Heads 'covering' themselves. As u can see, they are a very conceptual band. It seems like they want the performance to be 'art' and not just 'some band playing a ditty.'

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I'm not sure what the significance of this song is. Seems like it has some sort of lyrical relevance, but also might just be 'some babbling bro' with a 'simply structured pop song' underneath. Not sure if the Talking Heads are even 'that good.' I just know they have that one song about questioning your life, but I had always thought they were just some 'lame 80s band.' Sorta like how u thought Devo was 'just that band that sang WHIP IT' but then people are like 'those bros are really influential' or something.

Not sure if I like music. Feel like the music that is supposed to define me still hasn't been made yet. Will probably happen in 10-15 years.

This post is deep.

While nothing has really caught my ear in the past couple of days, I just wanted to post an overlooked song by some of the blogs who made a 'Best Songs of 2007' list.

I've never been too big of a Junior Senior fan, but in 2007, "Headphone Song" was a dependable hit for me. It's a song so catchy, that most people probably don't listen to the lyrics, but they should -- the song explores important territory when it comes escapism and the iPod generation. "Headphone Song" speaks of a theme which most BlogHouse/Banger fans should be able to empathize with, particularly when it comes to the search for the danciest mp3 to play as the background music for any trivial part of your day, or the continual search for the next party until you're 'bored with the whole scene' over and over again.

It's a song with so much pop appeal, it would probably inspire a Patrick Bateman-like rant about it's value. Watch his analysis of Huey Lewis and the News:
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cvypInm016M&rel=1]

"A song so catchy, most people probably don't listen to the lyrics, but they should, because it's not just about the pleasures of conformity and the importance of trends, it's also a personal statement about the band itself."

[MP3]
Junior Senior Headphone Song

Junior Senior's Myspace
http://www.myspace.com/juniorsenior

All Modern Authors are ripping off Bret Easton Ellis / American Psycho?


This article states that all modern authors are greatly influenced by the work of Bret Easton Ellis. Any emerging Gen Y author with a concise tone that describes sensational, detail oriented elements in an underwhelming/disaffected tone may or may not be ripping off the bro who wrote American Psycho.

It's no wonder, I think, that it's influencing a new generation of writers. The simplicity of the prose, the precision of his imagery, and the atmosphere of menace and cultural oblivion are invigorating even at this remove. The scene where Clay leaves a party at which they're showing a snuff movie is a masterful evocation of true horror; the erection visible in the pants of his friend as they walk to the car an image it is hard ever to shake.

I wonder if Gen Y authors are ripping him off bc they read him, or because they saw the sweet movie starring Christian Bale before he went mainstream.

Not sure if the movie Am Psych is more relevant/well-known than the book American Psycho, at least with Gen Y ppl.

Is Bret Easton Ellis the last great American author?
Are modern authors 'worthless'?
Is the movie American Psycho have a wider cultural reach than the book?
Should I just read the DaVinci Code?
What will Christian Bale's legacy be?
What's ur fave Bret Easton Ellis book?

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